Interviews

Interview: Make Up Artist Renee Milford

Renee Milford Make Up Artist
Photo: Antony Scully

Renee Milford: Make Up Artist

Skin skin skin. That`s my signature; having skin looking as natural as possible but still made up.


When did you start doing make up and how did you get into it?

In 2005 I had gotten a really good deal on make-up and I bought some make up so that I could sell it but I shipped it in and some of it was damaged when I got it. I couldn`t sell them so I used them as testers. I started playing around with it and I realised, and other people realised, that I had a knack for it. After that I just started to do courses and advanced it as time went on.

 

 “I started playing around with it and I realised, and other people realised, that I had a knack for it.”

How many courses would you say you`ve done between then and now?

I can tell you the main ones: the ones that I remember that really had an impact on my work. The first one was with TEMPTU in 2006, that`s the airbrush company. After that I did a class with Ephraim Hunte, that was maybe 2009. I did some more advanced training with TEMPTU in 2010.

In 2012 I did a class with Vanessa Evelyn, her school goes by the name Petra Alexandra Inc. That class really developed me in a bigger way. At that point in time a lot of things were still unclear for me technically as a make-up artist. But after that class I could look at a make-up brush and know what type of hair it`s made out of etc. It really brought me into a different space technically in terms of make-up.

“It really brought me into a different space technically in terms of make-up.”

Renee Milford Make up

What`s your favourite part of doing make up?

Perfecting skin. Skin skin skin. That`s my signature; having skin looking as natural as possible but still made up.

 

What was the process behind you realising or deciding that your signature style would be the natural, dewy type of makeup?

From the start it was a personal decision for me because I never really cared much for make up on myself, so I always tried to replicate that when I was doing my make-up – to keep it natural and light. I had an experience when I was younger, having my make-up done by someone, and I didn`t enjoy it. The person was rough on my face and that translated. When I looked at myself after I didn`t feel like me, I didn`t feel beautiful. I think that was a real defining moment for me, I said I wouldn`t treat someone`s skin like this. I want to see the person looking like themselves but just a little enhanced version. I`m really big with fiancés of brides because I always make sure that their brides look like themselves.

 

Which make up artists inspire you?

From the US I am mainly inspired by Sam Fine and I have a very strong admiration for many of the UK and Australian make-up artists. I absolutely love Lisa Eldridge, she`s from the UK. Also Charlotte Tilbury.  Dick Page, Vanessa Evelyn. Australian makeup artist Merton Muaremi does really really really really really beautiful work.

There are so many fantastic make-up artists now…

Yes, and there are different types of makeup artists. A make-up artist whose work is more about colour and matte skin can be on par with someone who uses a lot of neutrals and dewy skin. The thing about make-up is, it`s a matter of preference and what the client wants.

“The thing about make-up is, it`s a matter of preference.”

 

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